Across the web – links to honey articles and sites

The web provides a huge amount of information on honey and bees.  Here are a selection of useful sites that I refer to. There are some PDF guides here too.

Bee health

European commission

European Honey production

BBC Films on bees

USA Exporting to EU

Honey competition in the marketplace

The European Honey Market

Bee Topics and News

The Honey Commodity market

Global Guide to Honey

About honey

Bumble Bee Conservation

Honeybee health disorders – PDF

2016-03-pesticides-poisoned – PDF

honeybees – PDF

beemanual – PDF

Guide to honey quality 2009 – PDF

Honey ref guide -PDF

 

 

 

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All about the honey – Paper-Li

There are many articles on the web about the plight of bees, problematic issues around pesticides, mass pollination and bee-keeping methods.  One way I keep in touch with some of the issues is via Paper-Li, where a chosen selection of sites I have linked to my paper for ease of access.  Paper-Li is not a quick substitute for reading around the subject of bees and honey, but it does provide a link to sites I want to access on the go.  It does have its limitations, for example I cannot seem to find an archive, so its really read on the day its published.  But I hope you find the articles interesting and follow a few of the sites I have linked to.  To read more, the link is below.  I want to add some more European links in the future as the USA with its huge expanses of food production, dominate the news.  Hopefully I can find a balance.

 

Premo from London -my favourite bear

 

http://paper.li/PremofromLondon/1448747696

 

 

Middlesex Federation Day Part 2: Pam Hunter, How nutrition affects colony health — Adventuresinbeeland’s Blog

Sharing an important post. See link below.  Posted after seeing a shop selling bee-keeper products, supers and large containers of glucose. Not only that, but there were hoards of dead bees piled up in the window, where they had flown in at the scent of honey, but had no escape back out, dying of dehydration by the hot glass windows.  The owner should be ashamed.

My second post on the Federation of Middlesex Beekeepers’ Associations annual ‘Federation Day‘. Below are my notes from the second speaker, Pam Hunter. Pam is a Master Beekeeper who has been keeping bees for over 25 years. She is now Chairman of the BBKA Examinations Board, sets and marks module exams and is an assessor […]

via Middlesex Federation Day Part 2: Pam Hunter, How nutrition affects colony health — Adventuresinbeeland’s Blog

Notes from a talk by Norman Carreck – colony losses, native bees, pollen diversity and the small hive beetle — Adventuresinbeeland’s Blog

Yesterday I went to a talk by Norman Carreck, which was organised by the London Beekeepers Association (LBKA). One of the great things about being a beekeeper in London is being able to hear expert speakers like Norman. He is currently Science Director of the International Bee Research Association (IBRA), based at the Laboratory of Apiculture and Social Insects at […]

via Notes from a talk by Norman Carreck – colony losses, native bees, pollen diversity and the small hive beetle — Adventuresinbeeland’s Blog

The taste of the forest

Honeydew Honey is a rich flavoured honey, that comes from the secretions of sap sucking aphids on tree bark. It sounds quite an odd way of collecting honey, but the bees adore its sweetness and it produces a very dark, tangy, almost marmalade like honey.  The flavour is resin, balsam, caramel, malt. Pine, oak, chestnut, lime, willow and beech are just a few of the flavours you will find.  Not easy to buy in the London market, main supply in Europe is Greece, Bulgaria, Romania and along the Mediterranean.

The chestnut also produces flower blooms from June, before the catkins are formed, and from these bees will draw nectar and produce a strongly chestnut flavoured honey.  A prized honey, it can be very heady, as many of the honeydew honey’s can be.  Theses  woody honeys are either a honey you love or dislike and the flavour is strong and goes especially well with savoury food, or where you want to have a slightly more bitter flavour than blossom honey, for example on figs, or strong rye and nut breads. They work very well with cheeses, with the earthy flavours blending well with both soft and hard cheeses.

Premo From London Fir Honey

 

Premo from London Mountain Fir Honey flatbreads

For more information, I recommend The Honey Traveler website, honey enthusiasts heaven!

http://www.honeytraveler.com/single-flower-honey/honeydew-or-forest-honeys/